RSC Chairman Jordan: "Spending Bill Shows Democrats' Priorities"

The chairman of the 180-member conservative Republican Study Committee in the House of Representatives, Congressman Jim Jordan from Ohio, has a problem with spending by Democrats.  The bottom line is that the Democrats just do not want to cut spending but they do want to increase taxes on the American people.  Congressman Jordan also urges passage of a Balanced Budget Amendment.

Here is a comment RSC Chairman Jordan made yesterday:  "The rest of the bill continues federal spending through November 18 at a rate that’s just $7 billion below current levels. For some perspective, imagine the annual federal budget as a family who spends $3,600 a month, $1,300 of which is borrowed. In this scenario, the spending bill cuts $7.00 next month. That’s it. While this bill is almost certain to pass the House next Tuesday even without my support, there’s clearly still a lot of work left to do – and that makes a Balanced Budget Amendment even more important."

The rest of the press release from Congressman Jordan's office is directly below:

 

RSC Update: Spending Bill Shows Democrats’ Priorities

The spending package passed by the Senate last night reveals the startling priorities of Congressional Democrats. As passed by the House last week, the bill contained $3.65 billion to provide relief to the victims of tornados, hurricanes, earthquakes, and other disasters. After going through the Senate, that figure is now $1 billion less.

Why? Because the House tried to do right by taxpayers by “offsetting” the cost of that $1 billion with cuts to subsidies for carmakers and companies like Solyndra. Senator Harry Reid and his colleagues chose to protect these subsidies instead of providing more help to families struggling in the wake of disasters.

The rest of the bill continues federal spending through November 18 at a rate that’s just $7 billion below current levels. For some perspective, imagine the annual federal budget as a family who spends $3,600 a month, $1,300 of which is borrowed. In this scenario, the spending bill cuts $7.00 next month. That’s it. While this bill is almost certain to pass the House next Tuesday even without my support, there’s clearly still a lot of work left to do – and that makes a Balanced Budget Amendment even more important.

 

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