Occupy Movement

Prosecution For Not Grieving Properly? Commentary by Rev. Austin Miles

Most of the world witnessed the strange video reports of intense grieving of thousands of people in the streets following the death of North Korean dictator Kim Jong II on December 17th. Wherever the news cameras were in Communist Korea, men, women and children, were seen crying, actually wailng hysterically, with tears streaming down their faces.

It was puzzling to watch considering that Kim Jong II was a ruthless little dictator who ruled with iron fists, whose name alone struck terror in the hearts of all of his subjects. And perhaps that was the problem.

Inheriting the throne, his son, Kim Jong Un immediately issued orders for the military to begin rounding up and arresting those whom the government determined were not grieving sincerely and properly.

In Communist Russia, whenever a leader spoke, his required-to-be-there audience would applaud practically every sentence he spoke. When the speech ended, the applause continued non-stop for a prolonged length of time. The guards, positioned throughout the area, would notice who stopped applauding first and immediately arrest that person along with any others who had rested their hands. There had to be a spontaneous rapid wind-down and stopping of applause for nobody to be arrested.

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